zenonzequel:

ALRIIIIIIGHT

zenonzequel:

ALRIIIIIIGHT

September 30 2014, 01:34 AM   •   78,077 notes  •   VIA   •   SOURCE

skrillyssa:

best-of-memes:

Love foxes

edmdma
September 30 2014, 01:29 AM   •   234,921 notes  •   VIA   •   SOURCE

The Triplets of Belleville (2003) 

September 30 2014, 01:15 AM   •   575 notes  •   VIA   •   SOURCE

paulthomasandersonn:

The Triplets of Belleville (2003, dir. Sylvain Chomet, France)

Is that it, then? Is it over, do you think? What have you got to say to Grandma?

September 30 2014, 01:13 AM   •   2,095 notes  •   VIA   •   SOURCE

potterswheeezy:

Harry Potter Film Concept Art by Adam Brockbank (x)

September 30 2014, 01:11 AM   •   25,564 notes  •   VIA   •   SOURCE

reflectingblue:

raakellars:

bansheeandahunter:

False rape accusations are an anomaly.

True rape accusations are a norm.

You’re, quite literally, more likely to be killed by a comet than falsely accused of rape.

Re-blog now, read later.

"Because 1 in 33 men will be raped in his lifetime, men are 82,000x more likely to be raped than falsely accused of rape. It seems many of us would do well to pay more attention to how rape culture affects us all than be paranoid about false accusers.”

September 29 2014, 07:22 PM   •   46,164 notes  •   VIA   •   SOURCE
  • women: can u not touch our butts without knowing if we're okay with it? kthx.
  • men: modern feminism has gone TOO FAR. we already gave you THE VOTE and JOBS and now you're OPPRESSING US by assuming we're all RAPISTS. PATRIARCHY IS NOT REAL B/C NOT ALL MEN.
September 29 2014, 07:18 PM   •   18,043 notes  •   VIA   •   SOURCE

setbabiesonfire:

impala-sonic-deductions:

vivere-est-ars:

every woman on tumblr should have this on their dash

And every man

Look how nobody’s yelling or arguing or making things into a competition. Look how this is to straight up educate people through a different perspective. Look how effective that makes the message.

September 29 2014, 07:17 PM   •   592,572 notes  •   VIA   •   SOURCE
assbutt-in-the-garrison:

queendecuisine:

1863-project:

tigertwo1515:

did-you-kno:

Source

Damn

OKAY, LET’S TALK ABOUT ROBERT SMALLS (BECAUSE HE HAS A NAME, THANK YOU VERY MUCH).
ANYWAY.
Robert Smalls was born into slavery in 1839 and at the age of 12 his owner leased him out in Charleston, South Carolina. He gravitated towards working at the docks and on boats and eventually became the equivalent of a pilot, and in late 1861 he found himself assigned to a military transport boat named the CSS Planter.
On May 12, 1862, the white officers decided to spend the night on land. Smalls rounded up the enslaved crew and they hatched a plan, and once the officers were long gone they made a run for it, only stopping to pick up their families (who they notified) along the way. Smalls, disguised as the captain, steered the boat past Confederate forts (including Ft. Sumter) and over to the Union blockade, raising a white sheet his wife took from her job as a hotel maid as a flag of truce. The CSS Planter had a highly valuable code book and all manner of explosives on board.
Smalls ended up serving in the Union Navy and rose to the rank of captain there. He was also one of a number of individuals who talked to Abraham Lincoln about the possibility of African-American soldiers fighting for the Union, which became a reality.
After the war, Smalls bought his owner’s old plantation in Beaufort and even allowed the owner’s sickly wife to move back in until her death. He eventually served in the South Carolina House of Representatives (1865-1870), the South Carolina Senate (1871-1874), and the United States House of Representatives (1875-1879) and represented South Carolina’s 5th District from 1882-1883 and the 7th District from 1884-1887. He and other black politicians also fought against an amendment designed to disenfranchise black voters in 1895, but it unfortunately passed.
Smalls ended his public life by serving as U.S. Collector of Customs in Beaufort from 1889-1911. He died in 1915 at the age of 75.
And now you know Robert Smalls.

ROBERT SMALLS IS THE MAN.

There is actually a drunk history episode with the story of Robert Smalls and you should totally watch it HERE

assbutt-in-the-garrison:

queendecuisine:

1863-project:

tigertwo1515:

did-you-kno:

Source

Damn


OKAY, LET’S TALK ABOUT ROBERT SMALLS (BECAUSE HE HAS A NAME, THANK YOU VERY MUCH).

ANYWAY.

Robert Smalls was born into slavery in 1839 and at the age of 12 his owner leased him out in Charleston, South Carolina. He gravitated towards working at the docks and on boats and eventually became the equivalent of a pilot, and in late 1861 he found himself assigned to a military transport boat named the CSS Planter.

On May 12, 1862, the white officers decided to spend the night on land. Smalls rounded up the enslaved crew and they hatched a plan, and once the officers were long gone they made a run for it, only stopping to pick up their families (who they notified) along the way. Smalls, disguised as the captain, steered the boat past Confederate forts (including Ft. Sumter) and over to the Union blockade, raising a white sheet his wife took from her job as a hotel maid as a flag of truce. The CSS Planter had a highly valuable code book and all manner of explosives on board.

Smalls ended up serving in the Union Navy and rose to the rank of captain there. He was also one of a number of individuals who talked to Abraham Lincoln about the possibility of African-American soldiers fighting for the Union, which became a reality.

After the war, Smalls bought his owner’s old plantation in Beaufort and even allowed the owner’s sickly wife to move back in until her death. He eventually served in the South Carolina House of Representatives (1865-1870), the South Carolina Senate (1871-1874), and the United States House of Representatives (1875-1879) and represented South Carolina’s 5th District from 1882-1883 and the 7th District from 1884-1887. He and other black politicians also fought against an amendment designed to disenfranchise black voters in 1895, but it unfortunately passed.

Smalls ended his public life by serving as U.S. Collector of Customs in Beaufort from 1889-1911. He died in 1915 at the age of 75.

And now you know Robert Smalls.

ROBERT SMALLS IS THE MAN.

There is actually a drunk history episode with the story of Robert Smalls and you should totally watch it HERE

September 29 2014, 06:52 PM   •   53,932 notes  •   VIA   •   SOURCE

solar-citrus:

You would be surprised with how many people in your life could be going through depression at this very moment.  People hide it like a paper bag over their heads out of fear of being judged, made fun of, seen as weak, or just not taken seriously.  Depression should not be taken lightly, it holds us down from our purpose and potential in life.  Those who tell you that it doesn’t exist have never experienced depression in their life, therefore not understanding the symptoms and how it’s something that cannot be fixed in a day!  So if you think you are depressed or if you think you know someone else who is, please talk to a friend, a family member, or anyone else in your life that you trust - never overlook the possibility of seeing a doctor for more professional help!!  Your feelings are real, your feelings are shared upon millions.  Don’t hide it, talk to someone about it.  With the right help, you can rediscover your confidence and begin life anew with our undying love and support!

We are right here!!

September 29 2014, 06:19 PM   •   230,948 notes  •   VIA   •   SOURCE

elenamorelli:

{ the scent of autumn time }

September 29 2014, 06:18 PM   •   39,520 notes  •   VIA   •   SOURCE
bookriot:

We asked readers to share their favorite assigned reading. We tabulated the data and have your top 25 favorite books that you’ve been assigned to read.
Then we took it one step further and looked at where those favorite assigned titles overlapped with favorite books, most hated books, and the books you were most likely to pretend to have read.
Delicious, delicious data.

bookriot:

We asked readers to share their favorite assigned reading. We tabulated the data and have your top 25 favorite books that you’ve been assigned to read.

Then we took it one step further and looked at where those favorite assigned titles overlapped with favorite books, most hated books, and the books you were most likely to pretend to have read.

Delicious, delicious data.

September 29 2014, 06:05 PM   •   57 notes  •   VIA   •   SOURCE
September 29 2014, 05:00 PM   •   275,594 notes  •   VIA   •   SOURCE
xiaopa25:

(●′ω`●)

xiaopa25:

(●′ω`●)

September 29 2014, 04:59 PM   •   2,370 notes  •   VIA   •   SOURCE